Expedited Visa for
Serbia

When you need to get your visa for Serbia processed quickly, Travel Document Systems is here to help. All of the requirements and application forms, plus convenient online ordering.

Get a Tourist Visa for Serbia

Serbia issues Tourist visas for:
  • Tourist Travel

Serbia Tourist Visa for US Passport Holders Not Required

When you are travelling to Serbia with a U.S. Passport, a Tourist Visa is not required.

No visa required for a stay of up to 90 Days

Check travel recommendations

Serbia Tourist Visa for Non-US Passport Holders Required

When you are travelling to Serbia with a Non-US Passport, a Tourist Visa is required.

TDS is unable to assist at this time.

Please contact embassy directly.

Get a Business Visa for Serbia

Serbia issues Business visas for:
  • Business Travel

Serbia Business Visa for US Passport Holders Not Required

When you are travelling to Serbia with a U.S. Passport, a Business Visa is not required.

No visa required for a stay of up to 90 Days

Check travel recommendations

Serbia Business Visa for Non-US Passport Holders Required

When you are travelling to Serbia with a Non-US Passport, a Business Visa is required.

TDS is unable to assist at this time.

Please contact embassy directly.

Get a Diplomatic Visa for Serbia

Serbia issues Diplomatic visas for:
  • Official and Diplomatic Government Travel

Serbia Diplomatic Visa for US Passport Holders Not Required

When you are travelling to Serbia with a U.S. Passport, a Diplomatic Visa is not required.

No visa required for a stay of up to 90 Days

Check travel recommendations

Serbia Diplomatic Visa for Non-US Passport Holders Required

When you are travelling to Serbia with a Non-US Passport, a Diplomatic Visa is required.

TDS is unable to assist at this time.

Please contact embassy directly.

Travel Information

Get the most up-to-date information for Serbia related to embassy and consulate addresses, foreign relations information, travel advisories, entry and exit restrictions, and travel tips from the US State Department's website.

Vaccinations

No vaccinations required.

While no vaccinations may be required to enter the country, you should still check with the CDC on their recommended vaccinations for travel to Serbia

Get more health information for travelers to Serbia:

About Serbia

Read about the people, history, government, economy and geography of Serbia at the CIA's World FactBook.

A Brief History of Serbia

The Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes was formed in 1918; its name was changed to Yugoslavia in 1929. Various paramilitary bands resisted Nazi Germany's occupation and division of Yugoslavia from 1941 to 1945, but fought each other and ethnic opponents as much as the invaders. The military and political movement headed by Josip "TITO" Broz (Partisans) took full control of Yugoslavia when German and Croatian separatist forces were defeated in 1945. Although Communist, TITO's new government and his successors (he died in 1980) managed to steer their own path between the Warsaw Pact nations and the West for the next four and a half decades. In 1989, Slobodan MILOSEVIC became president of the Republic of Serbia and his ultranationalist calls for Serbian domination led to the violent breakup of Yugoslavia along ethnic lines. In 1991, Croatia, Slovenia, and Macedonia declared independence, followed by Bosnia in 1992. The remaining republics of Serbia and Montenegro declared a new Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FRY) in April 1992 and under MILOSEVIC's leadership, Serbia led various military campaigns to unite ethnic Serbs in neighboring republics into a "Greater Serbia." These actions led to Yugoslavia being ousted from the UN in 1992, but Serbia continued its - ultimately unsuccessful - campaign until signing the Dayton Peace Accords in 1995. MILOSEVIC kept tight control over Serbia and eventually became president of the FRY in 1997. In 1998, an ethnic Albanian insurgency in the formerly autonomous Serbian province of Kosovo provoked a Serbian counterinsurgency campaign that resulted in massacres and massive expulsions of ethnic Albanians living in Kosovo. The MILOSEVIC government's rejection of a proposed international settlement led to NATO's bombing of Serbia in the spring of 1999 and to the eventual withdrawal of Serbian military and police forces from Kosovo in June 1999. UNSC Resolution 1244 in June 1999 authorized the stationing of a NATO-led force (KFOR) in Kosovo to provide a safe and secure environment for the region's ethnic communities, created a UN interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK) to foster self-governing institutions, and reserved the issue of Kosovo's final status for an unspecified date in the future. FRY elections in September 2000 led to the ouster of MILOSEVIC, and in December 2000 a broad coalition of democratic reformist parties known as DOS (the Democratic Opposition of Serbia) was elected to parliament. DOS arrested MILOSEVIC in 2001 and sent him to be tried in The Hague for crimes against humanity. (MILOSEVIC died in March 2006 before the completion of his trial.) In 2001, the country's suspension from the UN was lifted. In 2003, the FRY became Serbia and Montenegro, a loose federation of the two republics with a federal level parliament. Widespread violence predominantly targeting ethnic Serbs in Kosovo in March 2004 caused the international community to open negotiations on the future status of Kosovo in January 2006. In May 2006, Montenegro invoked its right to secede from the federation and - following a successful referendum - it declared itself an independent nation on 3 June 2006. Two days later, Serbia declared that it was the successor state to the union of Serbia and Montenegro. A new Serbian constitution was approved in October 2006 and adopted the following month. In February 2008, after nearly two years of inconclusive negotiations, the UNMIK-administered province of Kosovo declared itself independent of Serbia - an action Serbia was powerless to stop, but which it refuses to recognize.

Learn more about Serbia in our World Atlas

About Us

Travel Document Systems, Inc. (TDS) is a leading visa and passport processing agency. For over 30 years we have served travel professionals, tour operators, and cruise lines, as well as corporate and individual international travelers. TDS specializes in travel that involves visas for more than one country.