Gibraltar Visa

When you need to get your Gibraltar travel visa processed quickly, Travel Document Systems is here to help. All of the Gibraltar visa requirements and application forms, plus convenient online ordering.

Gibraltar is a dependent territory of the UK.

Please see our United Kingdom page for information about entry requirements for Gibraltar

As an ongoing consequence of the global pandemic actual visa processing is typically taking longer than the usual times published here even in some instances where there is an option for the payment of higher consular fees for expedited processing. If you have a particularly tight departure please send us a note at inquiry@travedocs.com at the time you create your order to confirm it can reasonably be fulfilled in the current environment otherwise please just be aware of the possibility of delayed processing.

If you cancel your order after we have submitted your documents to a Consulate for processing there will be a $35.00 cancellation fee and your consular fees may not be refundable. Please do NOT contact consulates directly for status or with instructions once your documents have been submitted unless they contact you as this can cause processing to be delayed or declined.

A Brief History of Gibraltar

Strategically important, Gibraltar was reluctantly ceded to Great Britain by Spain in the 1713 Treaty of Utrecht; the British garrison was formally declared a colony in 1830. In a referendum held in 1967, Gibraltarians voted overwhelmingly to remain a British dependency. The subsequent granting of autonomy in 1969 by the UK led to Spain closing the border and severing all communication links. A series of talks were held by the UK and Spain between 1997 and 2002 on establishing temporary joint sovereignty over Gibraltar. In response to these talks, the Gibraltar Government called a referendum in late 2002 in which the majority of citizens voted overwhelmingly against any sharing of sovereignty with Spain. Since the referendum, tripartite talks on other issues have been held with Spain, the UK, and Gibraltar, and in September 2006 a three-way agreement was signed. Spain agreed to remove restrictions on air movements, to speed up customs procedures, to implement international telephone dialing, and to allow mobile roaming agreements. Britain agreed to pay increased pensions to Spaniards who had been employed in Gibraltar before the border closed. Spain will be allowed to open a cultural institute from which the Spanish flag will fly. A new noncolonial constitution came into effect in 2007, but the UK retains responsibility for defense, foreign relations, internal security, and financial stability.

Learn more about Gibraltar in our World Atlas