Timor Visa

When you need to get your Timor travel visa processed quickly, Travel Document Systems is here to help. All of the Timor visa requirements and application forms, plus convenient online ordering.

We're sorry, but we are unable to assist in obtaining any travel visas for Timor at this time.

As an ongoing consequence of the global pandemic actual visa processing is typically taking longer than the usual times published here even in some instances where there is an option for the payment of higher consular fees for expedited processing. If you have a particularly tight departure please send us a note at inquiry@travedocs.com at the time you create your order to confirm it can reasonably be fulfilled in the current environment otherwise please just be aware of the possibility of delayed processing.

If you cancel your order after we have submitted your documents to a Consulate for processing there will be a $35.00 cancellation fee and your consular fees may not be refundable. Please do NOT contact consulates directly for status or with instructions once your documents have been submitted unless they contact you as this can cause processing to be delayed or declined.

Travel Information

Get the most up-to-date information for Timor related to Timor travel visas, Timor visa requirements and applications, embassy and consulate addresses, foreign relations information, travel advisories, entry and exit restrictions, and travel tips from the US State Department's website.

Vaccinations

Get more health information for travelers to Timor:

About Timor

Read about the people, history, government, economy and geography of Timor at the CIA's World FactBook.

A Brief History of Timor

Portuguese and Dutch traders made the first western contact with Timor in the early 16th century. Sandalwood and spice traders, as well as missionaries, maintained sporadic contact with the island until 1642, when the Portuguese moved into Timor in strength. The Portuguese and the Dutch, based at the western end of the island in Kupang, battled for influence until the present-day borders were agreed to by the colonial powers in 1906. Imperial Japan occupied East Timor from 1942-45. Portugal resumed colonial authority over East Timor in 1945 after the Japanese defeat in World War II.

Following a military coup in Lisbon in April 1974, Portugal began a rapid and disorganized decolonization process in most of its overseas territories, including East Timor. Political tensions--exacerbated by Indonesian involvement--heated up, and on August 11, 1975, the Timorese Democratic Union Party (UDT) launched a coup d'etat in Dili. The putsch was followed by a brief but bloody civil war in which the Revolutionary Front for an Independent East Timor (FRETILIN) pushed UDT forces into Indonesian West Timor. Shortly after the FRETILIN victory in late September, Indonesian forces began incursions into East Timor. On October 16, five journalists from Australia, Britain, and New Zealand were murdered in the East Timorese town of Balibo shortly after they had filmed regular Indonesian army troops invading East Timorese territory. On November 28, FRETILIN declared East Timor an independent state, and Indonesia responded by launching a full-scale military invasion on December 7. On December 22, 1975 the UN Security Council called on Indonesia to withdraw its troops from East Timor.