Trinidad and Tobago Visa

When you need to get your Trinidad and Tobago travel visa processed quickly, Travel Document Systems is here to help. All of the Trinidad and Tobago visa requirements and application forms, plus convenient online ordering.

Get a Tourist Visa for Trinidad and Tobago

Trinidad and Tobago issues Tourist visas for:
  • Tourist Travel

Trinidad and Tobago Tourist Visa for US Passport Holders Not Required

When you are travelling to Trinidad and Tobago with a U.S. Passport, a Tourist Visa is not required.

No visa required for a stay of up to 3 Months

Check travel recommendations

Trinidad and Tobago Tourist Visa for Non-US Passport Holders Required

When you are travelling to Trinidad and Tobago with a Non-US Passport, a Tourist Visa is required.

Get My Tourist Visa

Get a Business Visa for Trinidad and Tobago

Trinidad and Tobago issues Business visas for:
  • Business Travel

Trinidad and Tobago Business Visa for US Passport Holders Not Required

When you are travelling to Trinidad and Tobago with a U.S. Passport, a Business Visa is not required.

No visa required for a stay of up to 3 Months

Check travel recommendations

Trinidad and Tobago Business Visa for Non-US Passport Holders Required

When you are travelling to Trinidad and Tobago with a Non-US Passport, a Business Visa is required.

Get My Business Visa

Get a Official or Diplomatic Visa for Trinidad and Tobago

Trinidad and Tobago issues Official or Diplomatic visas for:
  • Official or Diplomatic Government Travel

Trinidad and Tobago Official or Diplomatic Visa for US Passport Holders Not Required

When you are travelling to Trinidad and Tobago with a U.S. Passport, a Official or Diplomatic Visa is not required.

No visa required for a stay of up to 90 days

Trinidad and Tobago Official or Diplomatic Visa for Non-US Passport Holders Required

When you are travelling to Trinidad and Tobago with a Non-US Passport, a Official or Diplomatic Visa is required.

TDS is unable to assist at this time.

As an ongoing consequence of the global pandemic actual visa processing is typically taking longer than the usual times published here even in some instances where there is an option for the payment of higher consular fees for expedited processing. If you have a particularly tight departure please send us a note at inquiry@travedocs.com at the time you create your order to confirm it can reasonably be fulfilled in the current environment otherwise please just be aware of the possibility of delayed processing.

If you cancel your order after we have submitted your documents to a Consulate for processing there will be a $35.00 cancellation fee and your consular fees may not be refundable. Please do NOT contact consulates directly for status or with instructions once your documents have been submitted unless they contact you as this can cause processing to be delayed or declined.

Travel Information

Get the most up-to-date information for Trinidad and Tobago related to Trinidad and Tobago travel visas, Trinidad and Tobago visa requirements and applications, embassy and consulate addresses, foreign relations information, travel advisories, entry and exit restrictions, and travel tips from the US State Department's website.

Vaccinations

Vaccination Certificate for Yellow Fever Required if arriving from an infected area with 5 Days.

Get more health information for travelers to Trinidad and Tobago:

About Trinidad and Tobago

Read about the people, history, government, economy and geography of Trinidad and Tobago at the CIA's World FactBook.

A Brief History of Trinidad and Tobago

Columbus landed on and named Trinidad in 1498, and Spaniards settled the island a century later. Spanish colonizers largely wiped out the original inhabitants--Arawak and Carib Indians--and the survivors were gradually assimilated. Although it attracted French, free black, and other non-Spanish settlers, Trinidad remained under Spanish rule until the British captured it in 1797. During the colonial period, Trinidad's economy relied on large sugar and cocoa plantations. Tobago's development was similar to other plantation islands in the Lesser Antilles and quite different from Trinidad. During the colonial period, French, Dutch, and British forces fought over possession of Tobago, and the island changed hands 22 times--more often than any other West Indies island. Britain took final possession of Tobago in 1803. The two islands of Trinidad and Tobago were incorporated into a single colony in 1888. Trinidad and Tobago achieved full independence in 1962 and joined the British Commonwealth. Trinidad and Tobago became a republic in 1976.

The people of Trinidad and Tobago are mainly of African or East Indian descent. Virtually all speak English. Small percentages also speak Hindi, French patois, and several other dialects. Trinidad has two major folk traditions: Creole and East Indian. Creole is a mixture of African elements with Spanish, French, and English colonial culture. Trinidad's East Indian culture came to the island beginning May 30, 1845, with the arrival of indentured servants brought to fill a labor shortage created by the emancipation of the African slaves in 1838. Most remained on the land, and they still dominate the agricultural sector, but many have become prominent in business and the professions. East Indians have retained much of their own way of life, including Hindu and Muslim religious festivals and practices.

Learn more about Trinidad and Tobago in our World Atlas