Vanuatu Visa

When you need to get your Vanuatu travel visa processed quickly, Travel Document Systems is here to help. All of the Vanuatu visa requirements and application forms, plus convenient online ordering.

We're sorry, but we are unable to assist in obtaining any travel visas for Vanuatu at this time.

As an ongoing consequence of the global pandemic actual visa processing is typically taking longer than the usual times published here even in some instances where there is an option for the payment of higher consular fees for expedited processing. If you have a particularly tight departure please send us a note at inquiry@travedocs.com at the time you create your order to confirm it can reasonably be fulfilled in the current environment otherwise please just be aware of the possibility of delayed processing.

If you cancel your order after we have submitted your documents to a Consulate for processing there will be a $35.00 cancellation fee and your consular fees may not be refundable. Please do NOT contact consulates directly for status or with instructions once your documents have been submitted unless they contact you as this can cause processing to be delayed or declined.

Travel Information

Get the most up-to-date information for Vanuatu related to Vanuatu travel visas, Vanuatu visa requirements and applications, embassy and consulate addresses, foreign relations information, travel advisories, entry and exit restrictions, and travel tips from the US State Department's website.

Vaccinations

Get more health information for travelers to Vanuatu:

About Vanuatu

Read about the people, history, government, economy and geography of Vanuatu at the CIA's World FactBook.

A Brief History of Vanuatu

The prehistory of Vanuatu is obscure; archaeological evidence supports the commonly held theory that peoples speaking Austronesian languages first came to the islands some 4,000 years ago. Pottery fragments have been found dating back to 1300-1100 B.C.

The first island in the Vanuatu group discovered by Europeans was Espiritu Santo, when in 1606 the Portuguese explorer, Pedro Fernandez De Quiros, spied what he thought was a southern continent. Europeans did not return until 1768, when Louis Antoine de Bougainville rediscovered the islands. In 1774, Captain Cook named the islands the New Hebrides, a name that lasted until independence.

In 1825, trader Peter Dillon's discovery of sandalwood on the island of Erromango began a rush that ended in 1830 after a clash between immigrant Polynesian workers and indigenous Melanesians. During the 1860s, planters in Australia, Fiji, New Caledonia, and the Samoa Islands, in need of laborers, encouraged a long-term indentured labor trade called "blackbirding." At the height of the labor trade, more than one-half the adult male population of several of the Islands worked abroad. Fragmentary evidence indicates that the current population of Vanuatu is greatly reduced compared to pre-contact times.